Schedule of Events

01 Aug 2018 - 31 Jul 2019

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September

Refugee Stories: The Art of Mohamad Hafez - Mohamad Hafez
Wed, 05 Sep 2018, 8:00 PM – Sun Room, Memorial Union - Mohamad Hafez came to the United States to study architecture at Iowa State University and was unable to return to his beloved Syria. With the advent of the Syrian civil war in 2011, his home was forever changed. He will speak about his art, his refugee experience, and the stories of refugees from around the world, which he visually recreates in his exhibition Unpacked. The exhibit features miniaturized re-creations of a moment in time or a memory, each placed within a suitcase and accompanied by a recording of the refugee's story told in his or her own words.  The exhibition "Unpacked: Refugee Baggage" is in the Christian Petersen Art Museum, Morrill Hall, September 4-October 19.

The Art of Science: Bringing Pixar's Imagined Worlds to Life - Danielle Feinberg
Thu, 06 Sep 2018, 7:00 PM – Great Hall, Memorial Union - Danielle Feinberg, Pixar Animation Studio's Director of Photography for Lighting, uses math, science and code to bring wonder to the big screen. Go behind the scenes of Coco, Finding Nemo,Toy Story, Brave, WALL-E and more to discover how Pixar interweaves art and science to create fantastical worlds where the things you imagine can become real. Feinberg has a Bachelor of Arts in Computer Science from Harvard University. In addition to her Pixar work, she mentors teenage girls, encouraging them to pursue code, math and science.

Called to Lives of Meaning and Purpose: A New Approach to Vocation - Kathleen Cahalan
Mon, 10 Sep 2018, 7:00 PM – Sun Room, Memorial Union - Kathleen A. Cahalan is Professor of Theology at Saint John’s University School of Theology and Seminary and Director of the Collegeville Institute Seminars, for which she co-edited two recent volumes: Calling All Years Good: Vocation throughout Life’s Seasons and Calling in Today’s World: Voices from Eight Faith Perspectives. Cahalan also coordinates the Lilly Endowment’s Called to Lives of Meaning and Purpose Initiative, which began this year. Msgr. James A. Supple Lecture Series

The Dark Side of Big Data - Cathy O'Neil
Tue, 11 Sep 2018, 7:00 PM – Great Hall, Memorial Union - Cathy O'Neil is a mathematician, data scientist and the author of Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increases Inequality and Threatens Democracy. She will discuss the unintended negative consequences of using big data, including how so-called “objective” black-box algorithms have the potential to reinforce human bias in everything from sentencing to hiring workers. O’Neil began her career in academia before moving to the private sector, where she worked as a hedge-fund analyst during the credit crisis and then as a data scientist in the New York start-up scene. She writes regularly for Bloomberg View about algorithms, and in 2017 she founded the consulting firm ORCAA to audit algorithms for racial, gender and economic inequality. Part of the National Affairs Series

The Design Process, Autism and Animals - Temple Grandin
Thu, 13 Sep 2018, 7:00 PM – Great Hall, Memorial Union - Temple Grandin is a person with autism, and an expert on both autism and animal behavior. She is a professor of Animal Science at Colorado State University, and has a successful career consulting on both livestock handling equipment design and animal welfare. HBO made an Emmy Award winning movie about her life starring Claire Danes, and she is the subject of the BBC documentary “The Woman Who Thinks Like a Cow.” The unique way Grandin's visual mind works and the connection between her autism and animal temperament is the subject of her book Thinking in Pictures. In Animals in Translation, she explores the connection between autism and animal behavior. Her latest book, The Autistic Brain: Thinking Across the Spectrum, addresses scientific advances in understanding autism.

Latina Memories: A Chilean Human Rights Perspective - Marjorie Agosín
Mon, 17 Sep 2018, 7:00 PM – Sun Room, Memorial Union - Marjorie Agosín is an author, poet, and human rights activist known for her outspokenness for women's rights in Chile. Agosín was raised in Chile by Jewish parents, and her writings demonstrate a unique blending of Jewish and South American cultures. Her family moved to the United States to escape the horrors of the Pinochet takeover. Both her scholarship and her creative work focus on social justice, feminism, and remembrance. Agosín’s many awards include the Pura Belpré Award for I Lived on Butterfly Hill; the Letras de Oro Prize for her poetry, and a United Nations Leadership Award for Human Rights. She is currently a professor of Spanish at Wellesley College.

Mental Illness, Tragedy and Transformation: The Mark Becker Story - Joan & David Becker
Tue, 25 Sep 2018, 7:00 PM – Great Hall, Memorial Union - The Story County Mental Health Resource Fair will precede the lecture, 6:00-7:00pm in the South Ballroom. Joan and Dave Becker share their family’s story about their son Mark and the experience they had coping with his paranoid schizophrenia. They hope it will help other families, caregivers, and professionals understand how they can make a difference in moving forward and improving our mental health system. The Beckers spent years visiting doctors, pleading with state mental health services, and trying to get their son help for what was finally diagnosed as paranoid schizophrenia just three days before the unthinkable happened in their rural community of Parkersburg. National Recovery Awareness Month – Story County Mental Health Expo

October

William K. Deal Endowed Leadership Lecture
Tue, 02 Oct 2018, 7:30 PM – Sun Room, Memorial Union - Speaker to be announced.

Watergate 45 Years Later: What Have We Learned? - Panel Discussion
Mon, 08 Oct 2018, 8:00 PM – Great Hall, Memorial Union - Kathie Obradovich, Des Moines Register opinion editor, will moderate a program where panelists will discuss lessons learned from Watergate and their applicability today. Panelists are Nick Kotz, Pulitzer Prize-winning author; Edward Mezvinsky, congressman representing Iowa's 1st congressional district in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1973 to 1977, who served on the House Judiciary Committee during the Watergate hearings; and Jonathan Yarowsky, General Counsel to the U.S. House Judiciary Committee during the Watergate hearings. The Edward M. Mezvinsky papers are held in the University Library’s Special Collections and University Archives.

A Hollywood Career in Costume Design - Black Panther's Ruth Carter
Tue, 09 Oct 2018, 7:00 PM – Great Hall, Memorial Union - Ruth Carter is the Oscar-nominated costume designer for Marvel’s Black Panther, for which she conceptualized and created more than 1,000 costumes for the world of Wakanda. Carter has worked in the industry for more than three decades and is credited with over forty films. She earned Academy Award nominations for Best Costume Design for Spike Lee’s Malcolm X and Steven Spielberg’s Amistad as well as a 2016 Emmy Nomination for Roots. Carter has worked with Spike Lee on 14 films, beginning with School Daze and including Do the Right Thing, and is well known for her work on period ensemble films like Lee Daniels’ The Butler and Ava Duvernay’s Selma. Human Sciences Week 2018 and part of the 2018-19 Helen LeBaron Hilton Endowed Chair Lecture Series

George M. Beal Distinguished Lecture in Rural Sociology
Wed, 10 Oct 2018, 7:00 PM – Sun Room, Memorial Union - Speaker to be announced.

Norman Borlaug Lecture
Mon, 15 Oct 2018, 8:00 PM – Great Hall, Memorial Union - A reception and student poster display will precede the lecture from 7 to 8 p.m. in the South Ballroom, Memorial Union. Posters will address world food issues and are submitted by undergraduate and graduate students.

Lectures Program Event Being Planned
Tue, 16 Oct 2018, 7:00 PM – Great Hall, Memorial Union - Speaker to be announced.

Msgr. James A. Supple Lecture Series
Wed, 24 Oct 2018, 7:00 PM – Sun Room, Memorial Union - Speaker to be announced

Lion Conservation on a Crowded Continent - Craig Packer
Mon, 29 Oct 2018, 7:00 PM – Great Hall, Memorial Union - Craig Packer is director of the Lion Research Center at the University of Minnesota, where he is a professor in the Department of Ecology, Evolution & Behavior. For decades, Packer and his research team have conducted comprehensive long-term research on lion behavior and human-lion interaction for the famous Serengeti Lion Project. Their findings have shaped the way we understand lions and their role in complex savannah ecosystems and identified new approaches for protecting these dangerous predators. Packer is the author of Into Africa, which won the 1995 John Burroughs medal, as well as more than 100 scientific articles. Paul L. Errington Memorial Lecture

November

We Rise: Building a Movement that Restores the Planet - Xiuhtezcatl Martinez
Thu, 01 Nov 2018, 7:00 PM – Great Hall, Memorial Union - Xiuhtezcatl (‘Shu-Tez-Caht) Martinez is a 17-year-old indigenous climate activist, hip-hop artist, and a voice on the front lines of a global youth-led environmental movement. He has addressed the UN General Assembly, taken on local issues such as eliminating pesticides from parks, and is a lead plaintiff in a youth-led lawsuit against the U.S. government for their inaction on climate change. Martinez is Youth Director of the Earth Guardians, a tribe of young activists, artists, and musicians inspiring global change. He published his first book, We Rise, last year, which was followed by an appearance on The Daily Show with Trevor Noah. Celebrating 10 Years of the Live Green Initiative and part of the National Affairs Series: Building a Better Democracy

February

Chicano Activism and Immigration - Jimmy Patiño
Mon, 11 Feb 2019, 7:00 PM – Sun Room, Memorial Union - Jimmy Patiño, an assistant professor of Chicano & Latino Studies at the University of Minnesota, is the author of Raza Sí, Migra No: Chicano Movement Struggles for Immigrant Rights in San Diego. His work presents the perspectives of working-class Mexican-American and Mexican immigrant communities at the border and how different activist organizations from the late 1960s to the mid-1980s debated the problem of undocumented immigration. A native of Houston, Texas, Patiño recalls a childhood of hearing his from his grandparents about growing up during the era of Mexican–American segregation, which in part inspired his work on Chicano activism. He earned his PhD from the University of California, San Diego.

Why Rural Life Matters - Jim Ennis
Tue, 12 Feb 2019, 7:00 PM – Great Hall, Memorial Union - Jim Ennis is the executive director of Catholic Rural Life, a nonprofit organization dedicated to issues affecting rural communities, including a just and sustainable food supply and the spiritual, social, and economic wellbeing of rural America. Before joining CRL in 2008, Ennis was the director of FoodAlliance Midwest. He also has a background in project management and marketing with the Pillsbury Company and the Clorox Company. Jim Ennis earned an MBA from the University of Minnesota’s Carlson School of Management and holds a BS degree from the University of California-Davis, where he studied agricultural and managerial economics. Msgr. James A. Supple Lecture Series

National Affairs Series Event Being Planned
Mon, 25 Feb 2019, 7:00 PM – Great Hall, Memorial Union - Speaker to be announced. Part of the National Affairs Series: Building a Better Democracy

June

Lectures Program Event to be Scheduled
Sun, 30 Jun 2019, 12:00 PM – Great Hall, Memorial Union - National Affairs Series. Speaker to be announced.

Lectures Program Event to be Scheduled
Sun, 30 Jun 2019, 12:00 PM – To be announced - Phi Alpha Theta speaker to be announced.

Lectures Program Event to be Scheduled
Sun, 30 Jun 2019, 12:00 PM – Stephens Auditorium, Iowa State Center - National Affairs Series speaker to be announced