How Archaeology Killed Biblical History

Dr. Hector Avalos

Tuesday, 16 Oct 2018 at 6:30 pm – Campanile Room, Memorial Union

Hector Avalos is Professor of Religious Studies at Iowa State University. A former fundamentalist preacher and faith healer, Avalos is now one of the few openly atheist biblical scholars in academia. He will discuss how archaeology has been used to refute the claim that the Bible is historically accurate in depicting creation, the Exodus, the reign of Solomon and many other events. Avalos is the author or editor of ten books, including his most recent, The Bad Jesus: The Ethics of New Testament Ethics.
Not long before the year 1900, most academic historians would claim that most of the Bible was historically accurate. Today, most academic historians, even some in evangelical traditions, would argue that significant parts of the Bible are mythical, theological, or legendary in character. The lecture by Dr. Hector Avalos will explain how archaeology played a major role in refuting the claim that the Bible is historically accurate in depicting creation, the Exodus, the reign of Solomon and many other supposedly historical events.

Cosponsored By:
  • Atheist & Agnostic Society
  • Committee on Lectures (funded by Student Government)

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