Why Good Nutrition Should Be a Global Priority and How to Make It So

Lawrence Haddad & David Nabarro

Monday, 15 Oct 2018 at 8:00 pm – Great Hall, Memorial Union

Join a conversation with the 2018 World Food Prize Laureates about their work promoting child and maternal nutrition in Africa, South Asia, and Latin America. Lawrence Haddad and David Nabarro have been recognized for their efforts to persuade government and private sector development leaders to make child nutrition an urgent priority after prices of wheat, maize and rice nearly doubled in 2007-08, triggering a food crisis that had particularly dire consequences for new mothers and children under the age of two.

Lawrence Haddad is the executive director of the Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition and a pioneer in food policy research. He served as head of the Institute of Development Studies in the United Kingdom from 2004 to 2014 and subsequently co-chaired the Global Nutrition Report.

David Nabarro had a long career at the United Nations before retiring last year. He led the UN High Level Task Force on Global Food Security (2008-14), served as coordinator of the Scaling Up Nutrition (SUN) Movement (2010-14), worked as the UN Secretary-General’s Special Adviser on Sustainable Development and Climate Change, and beginning in 2015 served as Special Adviser on the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and Climate Change.

Iowa State University President Wendy Wintersteen will moderate the conversation.

The 2018 Norman Borlaug Lecture and part of the World Affairs Series

A reception and student poster display will precede the lecture from 7 to 8 p.m. in the South Ballroom, Memorial Union. Posters will address world food issues and are submitted by undergraduate and graduate students.
World Food Prize press release: Nutrition Champions Win 2018 World Food Prize for Leading Global Movement to Reduce Child Stunting

Biographical information: 2018 World Food Prize Laureates Lawrence Haddad and David Nabarro

Dr. Norman Borlaug (1914-2009) was a Cresco, Iowa, native whose discoveries sparked the Green Revolution. He received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1970 for his contribution to world peace through his wheat research and production that saved millions of lives worldwide. He founded the World Food Prize in 1986 to recognize the achievements of individuals who have advanced human development by improving the quality, quantity or availability of food in the world.

Cosponsored By:
  • College of Agriculture & Life Sciences
  • College of Human Sciences
  • College of Liberal Arts & Sciences
  • Nutritional Sciences Council
  • Office of the President
  • Seed Sciences Center
  • World Affairs
  • World Food Prize Foundation
  • Committee on Lectures (funded by Student Government)

Stay for the entire event, including the brief question-and-answer session that follows the formal presentation. Most events run 75 minutes.

Sign-ins are after the event concludes. For lectures in the Memorial Union, go to the information desk in the Main Lounge. In other academic buildings, look for signage outside the auditorium.

Lecture Etiquette

  • Stay for the entire lecture and the brief audience Q&A. If a student needs to leave early, he or she should sit near the back and exit discreetly.
  • Do not bring food or uncovered drinks into the lecture.
  • Check with Lectures staff before taking photographs or recording any portion of the event. There are often restrictions. Cell phones, tablets and laptops may be used to take notes or for class assignments.
  • Keep questions or comments brief and concise to allow as many as possible.