Latina Memories: A Chilean Human Rights Perspective

Marjorie Agosín

Monday, 17 Sep 2018 at 7:00 pm – Sun Room, Memorial Union

Marjorie Agosín is an author, poet, and human rights activist known for her outspokenness for women's rights in Chile. Agosín was raised in Chile by Jewish parents, and her writings demonstrate a unique blending of Jewish and South American cultures. Her family moved to the United States to escape the horrors of the Pinochet takeover. Both her scholarship and her creative work focus on social justice, feminism, and remembrance. Agosín’s many awards include the Pura Belpré Award for I Lived on Butterfly Hill; the Letras de Oro Prize for her poetry, and a United Nations Leadership Award for Human Rights. She is currently a professor of Spanish at Wellesley College.
Marjorie Agosín has written or edited more than eighty books. Her collections include The Angel of Memory (2001), The Alphabet in My Hands: A Writing Life (2000), Always from Somewhere Else: A Memoir of my Chilean Jewish Father (1998), An Absence of Shadows (1998), Melodious Women (1997), Starry Night: Poems (1996), and A Cross and a Star: Memoirs of a Jewish Girl in Chile (1995).

The Chilean government has honored Marjorie Agosín with a Gabriela Mistral Medal for Lifetime Achievement.

Cosponsored By:
  • Latino/a Studies Program
  • Committee on Lectures (funded by Student Government)

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