The Art of Science: Bringing Pixar's Imagined Worlds to Life

Danielle Feinberg

Thursday, 06 Sep 2018 at 7:00 pm – Great Hall, Memorial Union

Danielle Feinberg, Pixar Animation Studio's Director of Photography for Lighting, uses math, science and code to bring wonder to the big screen. Go behind the scenes of Coco, Finding Nemo,Toy Story, Brave, WALL-E and more to discover how Pixar interweaves art and science to create fantastical worlds where the things you imagine can become real. Feinberg has a Bachelor of Arts in Computer Science from Harvard University. In addition to her Pixar work, she mentors teenage girls, encouraging them to pursue code, math and science.
Danielle Feinberg began her career at Pixar Animation Studios in 1997 on the feature film A Bug's Life. She quickly discovered her love for lighting and went on to light on many of Pixar's feature films, including Toy Story 2, Monsters, Inc., the Academy Award-winning Finding Nemo, The Incredibles and Ratatouille. Feinberg's love of combining computers and art began when she was eight years old and first programmed a Logo turtle to create images. At Pixar, she worked her way from an entry-level, technical job to the Director of Photography for Lighting on Disney-Pixar’s Academy Award-winning films WALL-E and Brave and just finished working on Pixar's 2017 film Coco.

Cosponsored By:
  • Program for Women in Science and Engineering
  • Committee on Lectures (funded by Student Government)

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